Tag Archives: Bill Maher

Why I Criticize Christian Leaders: Part 3

simon_cowell

In The Pilgrim’s Regress CS Lewis talks about growing up and being handed a card that was covered front and back with rules.  He found that there was no possibility of following all of the rules, and this set him on his journey to find what truth really was.  

As I was wondering around in the forest of the Emergent Church (see part 2), I decided to follow what I believed to be God’s call on my life to serve as a pastor.  I honestly thought that I had something figured out, and was ready to lead a group of people in the same direction.  

My fervent determination to make a difference in the church instilled a passion for learning, and in the process was opened to a number of books and resources on church leadership and church models, which is how I was exposed to the work of Thom Rainer.

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Top 10 Posts for July

 

Here are the most clicked posts for July 2009:

  1. Father Knows Best
  2. Godwitter is Dead
  3. The Evangelist and the Megaphone
  4. Jesus Actually Meant It!
  5. ‘Post’ Because of ‘Un’

And the award for most challenging comments goes to:

As always, thanks for visiting, your challenges, and your encouragement!


‘Religulous’ is Ridiculous?

From the DVD jacket:

In this new comedy… comedian and TV host Bill Maher takes a pilgrimage across the globe on a mind-opening journey into the ultimate taboo: questioning religion.  Meeting the high and low from different religions, Maher simply asks questions, like “Why is faith good?” “Why doesn’t an all-powerful God speak to us directly?” and “How can otherwise rational people believe in a talking snake?”  For anyone who’s even a little spiritually curious, this divine entertainment will deepen your faith…in comedy!

Let’s just say that even from the jacket, it is obvious that there are quite a disparity of opinions being expressed in this “documentary” that comes in the spirit of a Michael Moore film.  Bill Maher has quite the abrasive personality that is also darkly engaging.  This seems to be at least at some level a personal journey for him.  The film starts with a conversation with his mother and is salted with his own experiences in being 50% Catholic and 50% Christian.

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