Tag Archives: Joel Osteen

Review: Promise of Provision, The: Living and Giving from God’s Abundant Supply

Promise of Provision, The: Living and Giving from God's Abundant Supply
Promise of Provision, The: Living and Giving from God’s Abundant Supply by Derek Prince
My rating: 2 of 5 stars

Is your life empty?  Do you not have the riches that you expected when you signed up for this Christianity thing?  Well, you are in luck because in his newest book (published posthumously) Derek Prince offers 5 steps and 3 principles that are sure to get God to pay up for what he owes you.  Of course, that is not the way he puts it.  In fact throughout the book he denies that he is teaching the prosperity gospel and that the term “prosperity” means more than finances, yet most of his examples of God’s promises fulfilled mean amassing large amounts of material wealth.

Though he expressly denies it, Prince, like the other “prosperity gospel” preachers including Joel Osteen and Joyce Meyer, teaches a strong perspective on the law.  Essentially he says that if we were to take God’s promises seriously and do what God commands, then we would have the wealth and prosperity that is promised in the Bible.  That is, as a matter of fact, entirely true.  The only trouble is that God expects perfect compliance with the Law, and none have been successful but Christ.

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Oprah and the Evangelical Church: Where Is the Difference?

Ranked as the world’s most influential woman, Oprah Winfrey is undoubtedly a woman who has inspired millions with not only her wisdom, her wide circle of connections, but also with her very own rags to riches story.  Although much ink has been spilled over her questionable influence in matters of spirituality, this post is not about her, instead it is about the church.

In 2005 a national survey of pastors was conducted, asking each of them to name the books that have most influenced them.  The Purpose-Driven Life was the most frequent response.  Authored by America’s pastor, Rick Warren, the book which has sold the most copies of any book in print, excepting only the Bible.  Warren, who has amassed significant wealth as a result, retains a significant level of influence including the ear of the President of the United States.

Here is where we play the game regularly found in copies of the children’s magazine Highlights: circle the differences in these two pictures.

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“It’s Your Time”: the Latest Refuse from Joel Osteen

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It has been said, “Never judge a book by it’s cover.”  Yet even alone, some book covers cause so much difficulty they require special notice.  After all, many more people are influenced by the cover of books as they glance over a bookstores wares than who actually read them.  Last week (November 3, 2009), a “new” installment of the tripe that Joel Osteen calls “truth” graced the shelves of bookstores across the country.  Having written two best-sellers that are essentially carbon copies of one another, any wise entrepeneur would make the third attempt to repackage the same refuse and sell it yet again.

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Paul Washer on the Scandal of the Gospel

If you want to know what Christianity is, take a look at this:

Chris Rosebrough does a critique of this lecture on his program, Fighting for the Faith.


Thank God for Atheists

God Creation of Adam

 It is often curious to people why I would wish to engage in dialogue with atheists, especially when I emphasize that my intention is in no way to convert or subject them to Christianity.  It comes at even a greater curiosity on both sides of the table for me to suggest that these conversations help me to actually strengthen and enrich my own belief.  In reading the book Christless Christianity by Dr. Michael Horton of the White Horse Inn radio/podcast, I ran across a few passages that may begin to help answer that question:

The search for the sacred has become a recurring cover story for national news magazines for some time now.  Although this search is often identified as an encouraging sign of interest in God, it may be more dangerous than atheism.  At least atheism makes arguments and shows an interest in a world external to the feelings of the inner self.  Furthermore, after each round of this quest for the holy grail, evangelicalism itself looks more and more indistinguishable from the ooze of pop spirituality more generally (page 159-60).

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