Tag Archives: Prosperity Gospel

Review: Promise of Provision, The: Living and Giving from God’s Abundant Supply

Promise of Provision, The: Living and Giving from God's Abundant Supply
Promise of Provision, The: Living and Giving from God’s Abundant Supply by Derek Prince
My rating: 2 of 5 stars

Is your life empty?  Do you not have the riches that you expected when you signed up for this Christianity thing?  Well, you are in luck because in his newest book (published posthumously) Derek Prince offers 5 steps and 3 principles that are sure to get God to pay up for what he owes you.  Of course, that is not the way he puts it.  In fact throughout the book he denies that he is teaching the prosperity gospel and that the term “prosperity” means more than finances, yet most of his examples of God’s promises fulfilled mean amassing large amounts of material wealth.

Though he expressly denies it, Prince, like the other “prosperity gospel” preachers including Joel Osteen and Joyce Meyer, teaches a strong perspective on the law.  Essentially he says that if we were to take God’s promises seriously and do what God commands, then we would have the wealth and prosperity that is promised in the Bible.  That is, as a matter of fact, entirely true.  The only trouble is that God expects perfect compliance with the Law, and none have been successful but Christ.

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“It’s Your Time”: the Latest Refuse from Joel Osteen

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It has been said, “Never judge a book by it’s cover.”  Yet even alone, some book covers cause so much difficulty they require special notice.  After all, many more people are influenced by the cover of books as they glance over a bookstores wares than who actually read them.  Last week (November 3, 2009), a “new” installment of the tripe that Joel Osteen calls “truth” graced the shelves of bookstores across the country.  Having written two best-sellers that are essentially carbon copies of one another, any wise entrepeneur would make the third attempt to repackage the same refuse and sell it yet again.

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Templeton Prayer Study FAIL!

Farm Prayer

Way back in 2006, the John Templeton Foundation published the results of its study on prayer and its effect on people who were suffering from major heart conditions and undergoing heart surgery.  The study was double-blind and used a control group.  Two groups were chosen, one of which were prayed for and the other which was not, but neither were told which group they were in.  A third group served as a control were prayed for and told this.

After 2.4 million dollars invested from the Templeton Foundation and 2.3 million invested from the federal government, here are the results:

  • More people (59%) in the control group suffered more complications than in the groups who did not know if they were being prayed for (51%).
  • 18% of those in the uninformed prayer group suffered major complications (including heart attack) as compared to 13% in the group that did not receive prayers.

These results have precedent: the New York Times reports on a study done in 1997 studied 40 alcoholics in recovery.  Those who were prayed for did worse than those who were not.

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‘Religulous’ is Ridiculous?

From the DVD jacket:

In this new comedy… comedian and TV host Bill Maher takes a pilgrimage across the globe on a mind-opening journey into the ultimate taboo: questioning religion.  Meeting the high and low from different religions, Maher simply asks questions, like “Why is faith good?” “Why doesn’t an all-powerful God speak to us directly?” and “How can otherwise rational people believe in a talking snake?”  For anyone who’s even a little spiritually curious, this divine entertainment will deepen your faith…in comedy!

Let’s just say that even from the jacket, it is obvious that there are quite a disparity of opinions being expressed in this “documentary” that comes in the spirit of a Michael Moore film.  Bill Maher has quite the abrasive personality that is also darkly engaging.  This seems to be at least at some level a personal journey for him.  The film starts with a conversation with his mother and is salted with his own experiences in being 50% Catholic and 50% Christian.

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